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October is Non-GMO Month

  • greenjourney

Quoted from the Organic News page of the October issue of Acres, USA which just arrived in our mailbox...

October is Non-GMO month and on Sunday, October 16, 2011, the Organic Consumers Association's Millions Against Monsanto campaign is calling for World Food Day actions to demand labels on genetically engineered foods and a moratorium on the use of genetic engineering in agriculture and food production. For more information visit http://www.organicconsumers.org and http://www.nongmoproject.org/non-gmo-month.

Aline Crehore, Green Journey Seeds
In Plants We Trust
http://www.poppyswap.com/shop/greenjourneyseeds

Replies to this topic

  • RosaArtemisia
  • gwendolyn ♥

Thanks for posting this.  I went and took a look a few weeks ago, and there is a lot of great information on these websites.  Also, there is an opportunity to register your business- sort of like a green directory- and it will help locals find you if you are running a very tiny business, such as mine.

I remember several years back when our local university decided they wanted to grow test crops of GMO foods.  It was put on the ballet for our local elections, and I was affiliated with a small local group that dedicated itself to educating people on how to read the measure.  The measure used tricky language- if you didn't want GMO testing you had to vote "yes" and if you did want the testing you had to vote "no".  Unfortunately, most people didn't understand this, so when they voted "no" they thought they were saying, "No, I don't want this testing in our area."  Sadly, the measure passed.

But, our community has been lucky enough to be the home of a tiny little farm that doesn't grow GMO foods.  I put off asking them for awhile- for some reason they don't advertise it even though they advertise that they are organic and sustainable.  Finally, I decided that I had to know for sure, so I asked and they confirmed that they don't support GMO agriculture.  I wonder why they don't advertise it?  Are they afraid of rubbing our mostly conservative population the wrong way?  It seems like something you would want to brag about.  I might ask them about that sometime in the near future.

Anyway, they were also selling wild Elderberries from a woman who has a farm filled with elder trees.  They kept telling everyone how nasty the berries taste, so of course no one wanted to buy them.  I found that to be rather odd.  I volunteered to teach them how to use Elderberries in a way that would be tasty, but they didn't take me up on it.  I think I shall take them a bottle of Elderberry syrup just for fun!!

Gwendolyn Rose Botanicals ~ ♥
http://www.GwendolynForever.etsy.com
  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

Thanks for your thoughtful reply and further questions, Gwendolyn. I'll be thinking of you as I gather our elderberries, too.

You've highlighted a big political issue in your post...when yes means no the confusion is inevitable. Thanks for trying to turn no into Yes!

The burden of proof lies with the farmer in the second instance. He or she can truthfully assure you that he doesn't buy GMO seeds. However, he can not know for sure that his land is not contaminated by genetic drift. He or she can test for GMO residues in his crops, but I image the cost of sampling and testing each crop is prohibitive for a family farmer. The results can only reflect what is in each sample.

If the farmer(s) brag or advertise about not growing GMO foods, they can likely expect to be sued by the likes of Non-santo for defaming their precious property. I would be interested to hear what your farmers have to say...and if you succeed in turning them onto elderberries?

I'm gonna make some elderberrry syrup for my cough, and even though I'll cut the honey in Richo's recipe in half, it is still mighty sweet to me!

Aline

  • RosaArtemisia
  • gwendolyn ♥

Hello Aline,

You know, I should've known that about the farmer and Monsanto.  I didn't even think of it, but I should've known.  I'll ask about it sometime, but I'll probably wait to get to know them a little bit better. 

As for turning the No into Yes... well, we all do our best.  We were a tiny group of student activists, but at least we tried.

As for the elderberries, I haven't been back to the farm in a few weeks.  I always seem to be forgetting something when I leave the house, and its usually my elderberry syrup!! But I'll get it to them one of these days.  I actually thought about printing out some of the blog posts about elderberries and making them into a sort of pamphlet.  Keep it simple, and let the experts do the talking, you know?  Any how, it was lucky that they asked me about it.  When I heard there was a lady in town who had a farm full of elderberries I just had to have her number.  So, of course they became curious about my interest in elderberries... and one thing led to another.  Anyway, they seemed interested, but I'm sort of glad they didn't take me up on it.  Giving a workshop feels like overkill for me.  A friendly bottle of Elderberry syrup is a better fit for me.

Thanks for the reply, Aline.

  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

I came across a surprising fact in my reading this week. The Honey Trail,  In Pursuit of Liquid Gold and Vanishing Bees, by Grace Pundyk takes us on a sticky, bittersweet journey around the world to discover how how honey and honeybees are faring in in our globalized economy. In the chapter about Austrailia, she states, "In fact, so financially viable is the industry that poppies are the only GM crop permitted to be grown on the island..."

Wow, why didn't I hear about this, before now? And doesn't Tasmania (the island Grace refers to) claim to be GMO-free? This was written in 2008, and apparently GSK pulled their funding on this project, but I can't seem to find out what is the current state of affairs?

And what about our beloved poppies? Well, we have learned that honeybees love poppies, and when they are in bloom, our honeybees vastly prefer poppy flowers to even the highly touted "bee's friend" Phacelia tanacetifolia.

As a seed grower, I can assert that we are opposed to GMOs, and will never "knowingly" sell contaminated seeds. Now that I know of the existence of the GMO poppies, I will be on the alert for updates and post them to this forum.

Fortunately, Tasmania is an island and very far away, too far in all probability for genetic drift to be a concern...but it seems that poppies are being exploited for increasing drug production (which we won't talk about here) and for their seed oil use as a biofuel. So, who can say what research plantings are being done in secret?

Remember GMO sugar beets? Organic seed grower Frank Morton asked his farming community to identify where GMO beets were being planted years ago in the research stage, so that he could protect his seed crops from contamination. Well they refused, citing fears of ecoterrorism, and kept the locations secret.

The GMO beets didn't know how to keep a secret, and found themselves in surplus, the surplus was dumped on a compost pile, the compost was coveted and hauled off by an unsuspecting potting soil maker and showed up a Corvallis, OR garden center as a "fertile" potting mix...soon these "GMO beet transplants" were growing in gardens around the place.

The long story can be found in Wild Garden Seeds seed catalogs (a great source for vegetable seeds). The short of it tells us to be alert, know where your seeds, compost or potting mix comes from, share information and agitate for change. I'd say GMOs are guilty until proven innocent.

A friend emailed me this morning her favorite sign from occupywallstreet is "MONSANTO- YOU GOIN' DOWN!"

Thanks, Gwendolyn and poppyswap for all that you do...

Aline

  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

I came across a surprising fact in my reading this week. The Honey Trail,  In Pursuit of Liquid Gold and Vanishing Bees, by Grace Pundyk takes us on a sticky, bittersweet journey around the world to discover how how honey and honeybees are faring in in our globalized economy. In the chapter about Austrailia, she states, "In fact, so financially viable is the industry that poppies are the only GM crop permitted to be grown on the island..."

Wow, why didn't I hear about this, before now? And doesn't Tasmania (the island Grace refers to) claim to be GMO-free? This was written in 2008, and apparently GSK pulled their funding on this project, but I can't seem to find out what is the current state of affairs?

And what about our beloved poppies? Well, we have learned that honeybees love poppies, and when they are in bloom, our honeybees vastly prefer poppy flowers to even the highly touted "bee's friend" Phacelia tanacetifolia.

As a seed grower, I can assert that we are opposed to GMOs, and will never "knowingly" sell contaminated seeds. Now that I know of the existence of the GMO poppies, I will be on the alert for updates and post them to this forum.

Fortunately, Tasmania is an island and very far away, too far in all probability for genetic drift to be a concern...but it seems that poppies are being exploited for increasing drug production (which we won't talk about here) and for their seed oil use as a biofuel. So, who can say what research plantings are being done in secret?

Remember GMO sugar beets? Organic seed grower Frank Morton asked his farming community to identify where GMO beets were being planted years ago in the research stage, so that he could protect his seed crops from contamination. Well they refused, citing fears of ecoterrorism, and kept the locations secret.

The GMO beets didn't know how to keep a secret, and found themselves in surplus, the surplus was dumped on a compost pile, the compost was coveted and hauled off by an unsuspecting potting soil maker and showed up a Corvallis, OR garden center as a "fertile" potting mix...soon these "GMO beet transplants" were growing in gardens around the place.

The long story can be found in Wild Garden Seeds seed catalogs (a great source for vegetable seeds). The short of it tells us to be alert, know where your seeds, compost or potting mix comes from, share information and agitate for change. I'd say GMOs are guilty until proven innocent.

A friend emailed me this morning her favorite sign from occupywallstreet is "MONSANTO- YOU GOIN' DOWN!"

Thanks, Gwendolyn and poppyswap for all that you do...

Aline

  • RosaArtemisia
  • gwendolyn ♥

Thank YOU, Aline! ♥  I'm so glad you brought this topic to the forefront, and I hope it continues to be something we talk about here on PoppySwap!

  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

Just got this in an email from one of our plant allies, Mountain Rose Herbs. Just Label It is a campaign to label GMOs. Read more about it on their blog and please consider this an important issue...

http://mountainroseblog.com/label/

Aline

  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

My list of harvest chores is long and duty calls, but I also feel the need to renew this thread, as it is October once more.

I'll just give you a link to a short 3 part video interview with Dr. Vandana Shiva, whose understanding of these issues (genetic engineering and all of its ramifications)has informed my work. She is the brightest star in my personal constellation of seedwomen! I had the distinct honor of meeting her at the Uof O in spring 2011, just long enough to introduce myself and give her a gift of our seeds!

Please listen and pass it on!

Aline

  • Aline Crehore
  • Aline Crehore

With election results coming in, let's turn our attention back to this issue. (Thanks to this spammer for bringing it back to the top of the forum.)  

This has been called the Food Fight of the Decade, but it's beginning to feel like the food fight of my life! Yes, as an organic gardener/farmer, I'm proud to be a foodie, and I'm not ashamed to buy organic whenever possible. I consider it a right not a privilege, a necessity not a luxury. A way of life, not a fad. GE foods are not even worthy of composting, to my way of thinking.

So, we have lost the first battle, but not the war! California's Prop 37 was defeated yesterday by corporate greed, but with 95% of the vote counted, the difference was only 6%. People are getting hip, and this truly grassroots campaign has done much to raise awareness of genetic engineering.

When I think that Organic brands contributed to the defeat of this GMO labeling initiative, I feel sick. I'm going to fix a cup of tea and refer you to Cornucopia Institute's report.

That's the the news from the farm! Green Journey goes on...

Love, Aline (rhymes with green)

 

 

@Aline: I have no idea why all of this spam has just crept up all of the sudden. Does the forum have as high a level of security as the site itself? I wish there was some sort of way that it could be prevented. Maybe we can all help Kiki, once she's able, to solve this issue. Back to the topic at hand: I was deeply saddened when I learned the results of Prop 37. Thanks for sharing this article! I'm going to check it out. I admire your passion and willpower. I believe people like you will inspire others to eventually understand how important this matter really is.

"For you there's rosemary and rue; these keep seeming and savour all the winter long:
Grace and remembrance be to you both..." --- William Shakespeare, THE WINTER'S TALE
<<< I PoppySwap @ http://www.poppyswap.com/shop/RosemaryandRue >>>

@Aline: I came back this morning to check out your article and the link does not work :(

  • Aline Crehore
  • Aline Crehore

Your right Cassandra, I'm getting an error on that permalink today also. Try this one for Cornucopia Institute's homepage?

Thank you for your support! My next step is to get in touch with my state's GMO-free Oregon group. I met these folks at a Green Faire last spring who I can connect with locally. Is there a like minded group in your state? Oregon has an initiative process like California, if enough residents sign a petition, and it gets approved for the ballot we get to vote on it. What about North Carolina?

As to your question, no the forum is basically open to everyone who has email. The blog is more selective, you have to put a puzzle together to comment there, and posting is limited. Of course the site administrator can delete forum posts at will, and I have requested they look into this recurring problem. I'll contact the programmer Aaron and let you know if I hear anything. Prevention would be best, yes! I'd hate to see this forum shut down.

Ugg is the word, but I spell it Ugh!

Love, Aline

  • Aline Crehore
  • Aline Crehore

Darn, that link isn't doing it today, either. I am able to bring it up by going thru google, but not by pasting the link here. Try googling Cornucopia Institute, or try these links later. Sometimes servers are too busy, and there has been another storm back east...

Curious me?

  • greenjourney
  • greenjourney

October 16, 2013 WORLD FOOD DAY

Vandana Shiva

http://seedfreedom.in/the-gmo-emperor-has-no-clothes-world-food-day-message-from-vandana-shiva/

BE A SEED KEEPER! SEED SAVING IS A HUMAN RIGHT & NECESSITY!

Love, Aline

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